The Art of Katsushika Hokusai Part III


When he was 12, his father sent him to work in a bookshop and lending library, where the books were made from wood-cut blocks. Two years later, he became an apprentice to a wood-carver. He worked here until he turned 18. After this, was accepted into the studio of Katsukawa Shunshō,  a ukiyo-e artist. Ukiyo-e focused on images of the courtesans and Kabuki actors.

After Shunshō’s death in 1793, Hokusai began exploring French and Dutch copper engravings. He changed the subjects of his works, focusing more on landscapes and images of the daily Japanese life. A change that was a breakthrough in ukiyo-e. Next, he began to produce brush paintings, called surimono.

In 1811,  he created the Hokusai Manga. His later sketches and caricatures influenced the modern form of today’s manga. In all there are 12 volumes that include thousands of drawings.

Plum Blossom and the Moon - Katsushika Hokusai - www.katsushikahokusai.org

“Plum Blossoms and the Moon

Cranes on a Snowy Pine - Katsushika Hokusai - www.katsushikahokusai.org

“Crane on a Snowy Pine”

“Drawing of a Tengu”

Dragon

“Courtesan. Painting on silk”

“Puppet”

“Old Tiger in the Snow”

White Shell (Shiragai) - Katsushika Hokusai - www.katsushikahokusai.org

White Shell (Shiragai)”

Horse Talisman (Mayoke) - Katsushika Hokusai - www.katsushikahokusai.org

“Horse Talisman (Mayoke)”

Surimono Uma (No) Senbetsu. Cadeau D'Adieu - Katsushika Hokusai - www.katsushikahokusai.org

Surimono Uma (no) Senbetsu

Surimono Anba Umafubuki. Cheval D'Arcons Et Bardane - Katsushika Hokusai - www.katsushikahokusai.org“Surimono Anba Umafukuki”

Katsushika Hokusai, The Complete Works     http://www.katsushikahokusai.org/

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One thought on “The Art of Katsushika Hokusai Part III

  1. Hello

    I am Lee Jay and the Chief Editor and joint owner of Modern Tokyo Times.

    Our readership is over 110,000 in five months and growing by around 7,000 per week and currently we are trying hard to expand art related areas in order to show the importance of Japanese art and the rich diversity of people like Hokusai (applies to landscape, shunga, and so forth).

    Please check http://moderntokyotimes.com and if we could publish some of your articles or if you write future articles and allow us to publish, then this would be a great honor.

    At all times we would only state your name and add your website information in order that people can check your fascinating website.

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